The Season of Neglect

This blog post is so titled because, in spite of spending daily time on the internet, I’ve ignored this page. I really don’t know why. Not because I don’t have anything to say – meet me in person and you’ll be lucky to get a word in – hmmm.

Maybe I have social media fatigue. I can see it now on page 3 of the Science Times section of the Tuesday NY Times. “Social Media Fatigue Strikes Over 50 – No Cure Know”.

I like the spontaneity of facebook and twitter – but most of the postings lack intimacy. Yes, intimacy. Something that’s missing from most people’s vocabulary and is a phenomenon of our times. No hugs, air kisses, office pot lucks or water cooler gab for most of us to brighten our day.We work at home and our social life is on the internet.

It was bound to happen sooner or later  – striking first at those who thought they would like working in their sweatpants. Or, whether by choice or not, they’re now hanging out their own shingle. Last week I decided to take a run through my linkedin contacts to see who I hadn’t been in touch with for a while. More than 50% of them used to work for companies, have benefits, go on nice vacations. They have their own company now – Joe Blow Inc. – consultant on any topic that will pay the rent. Benefits none. Pride (slightly wounded).

What’s kind of crazy about all is this is that the area that I dabble in has at its very core that relationships are made by connecting over a meal, a glass of wine.  Strangers become friends for life when you break bread with them – you know saying.

Twit me up, virtual taste me – it’s not the same as sitting across from a friend (or total stranger) and hearing them laugh – or groan – or snort (now that’s a sound that you don’t hear a lot of on fb or twitter!).

When was the last time you met someone for lunch? dinner? Coffee? A cocktail? A walk? Seriously. Can’t remember?

Technology was supposed to be a 24-hour solution for doing more in less time – not wasting time doing less. “Checking In” is supposed to let friends know where you are so they can meet you if they’re in the neighborhood – not for getting points for telling people where you are (that they are not!)

All of this leads to loneliness – and that leads to anger and frustration – and that leads to …well, Tuesday’s race results weren’t hard to predict.

I was hoping the wave of the new political movement would have signs that said “Make Someone Smile Today”, “Lend a Hand to Those in Need”, “Give Something You’re Not Using to Someone Who Needs It” – instead of cries of “What Have You Done for Me Lately?”

Yes, I’m frustrated too. We need to remember that we’re only on this planet a short while. We should make a difference and leave it in better shape to those who follow in our footsteps.

Well, I guess that calls for a glass of wine.

Julie

You can reach me at julie@womenwine.com

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5 responses to “The Season of Neglect

  1. Roberta Rinaldi

    Beautifully put, Julie. This inspired me to get out my damned phone book and call the friends I’ve been communicating with telepathically to meet for face time–not Facebook!

    • ok – here’s how bad i am – i still haven’t read your article! but crazy enough someone contacted me who I’m meeting next week who worked with me at Windows on the World – how crazy is that! xxx hope to see you soon

  2. Ah yes, the breaking of the bread. Isn’t that the way the disciples on the way to Emaus recognized Jesus? They wanted to just keep talking. All that noise on fb and twitter gives no satisfaction. I am meeting with my panel on Monday to sip and taste through 14 sparkling wines to review for my email wine newsletter. But after reading your article I decided to ask a lady friend out for lunch before my tasting. ( and she always gives me such a meaningful hug.) I just made a reservation at the restaurant where I will be doing my tasting. Life is too short to twitter it away with meaningless chatter. Thank you, Julie

  3. I love reading your website because you can constantly bring us new and cool stuff, I think that I must at least say thanks for your hard work.

    – Henry

  4. Great blog, near swain that wrote so often. The pipe reaction that writes to-date knowledge :)

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